How To Get Air Out Of Water Lines

Last Updated On November 18, 2022
Solved! How to Get Air Out of Water Lines

Do you suspect trapped air in your water lines? Air in your home’s water lines can lead to plumbing complications, so you’ll want to release the air manually if it doesn’t happen by itself. 

Learn how to tell if you have air in your water lines and how to resolve the issue fast.

In this PlumbingNav guide, we will cover:

  • How to get air out of water supply lines in house
  • How to remove air out of well water lines
  • How to troubleshoot air bubble out of refrigerator water lines
  • Common causes of air in your water lines
  • Signs of air in your water lines
  • Complications due to air in your water lines

What's In This Guide?

      Things to Know About Getting Air Out of Water Pipes in Your House 

      Common Causes Of Air In Your Water Lines

      Maintenance

      The main reason that air will enter your water lines is shutting off your water supply during maintenance or repairs. When you turn off the water to your pipes at the shutoff valve, air may remain in the pipes even after the pipes completely drain. 

      Low water levels

      If you get your water from a private well, air can get in your water lines thanks to low water levels. Another thing to check is a leak in your expansion tank that may allow excessive air to enter the system. Wells can also experience low water levels due to age or, possibly a blockage.

      Water hammer

      A water hammer can lead to air in your pipes. A water hammer refers to the phenomenon of liquid (or gas) unexpectedly changing direction. When this happens, air can get stuck inside the pipes. 

      Airblock at water heater

      Additionally, air can get into your water lines from the water heater when you need hot water. Since this indicates high-pressure levels, you should watch your water heater carefully and check the release valve. 

      While not necessarily a concern for an actual explosion, you don’t want pressure building up in the water heater. 

      Exposed pipes

      Finally, exposed pipes may allow compressed air inside of them if they have a leak. Air in outdoor pipes can contribute to frozen pipes as the cold air mixed with the water will lead to expedited freezing. 
      You can avoid a frozen pipe by using frost-free outdoor hose bibs and insulating your pipes properly.

      did you know How To Get Air Out Of Water Lines

      Signs of Air in Your Water Lines

      Signs of air in your water lines include:

      Complications Due To Air In Your Water Lines

      The immediate problem you will notice when you have air in your water lines is that you will have reduced water pressure and an unpleasant sputtering when you activate your faucets. However, the real problem occurs down the road. 

      Air can expedite corrosion of your metal pipe. While corrosion occurs more quickly when oxygen combines with water, the oxygen alone can unexpectedly cause corrosion. 

      Solved! How to Get Air Out of Water Lines

      How to get air out of water supply lines in house

      The simplest way to remove air from supply lines is to turn on all of the faucets in your home about ⅛ of the way for two minutes to force pressure through your plumbing system, forcing the air out of the pipes. 

      How to get air out of well water lines

      When you notice sputtering coming from your well water lines or RV water lines when you activate the water pump, it can indicate that the water pressure tank doesn’t have enough air. 

      If your water pressure tank doesn’t have enough air, you’ll have to replace the water pressure tank as well as the bladder. 

      How to get air bubble out of refrigerator water lines

      When you get air in your refrigerator water lines, it can cause your air conditioning to run less efficiently. 

      Signs of air in refrigerant lines include:

      • High condensing pressure
      • Elevated evaporating pressure
      • High discharge temperature
      • Elevated compression ratios

      If you suspect air in your refrigerant lines, you must enlist the services of a professional HVAC tech to purge the air from the discharge valve. 

      Legally, a professional must complete this task. This is not a DIY project.

      Final Thoughts On Removing Air From Home Water Lines

      Your water pipe should not have air inside of it. When you do notice air in your water line, you can take some simple steps to expel the excess air and restore proper balance. If the problem is a regular occurrence, look into water heater replacement or pipe replacement. 

      FAQs on How to Get Air Out of Water Pipes

      How do you bleed air from water pipes?

      For standard city water supply lines, open each faucet in your home slightly (about ⅛ of the way) for two minutes to force the air out thanks to the pressure you create by activating all of your home’s fixtures. 

      How long does it take to get air out of water lines?

      Getting air out of your water lines doesn’t take much time at all! In fact, you can finish the task in about two minutes. It’s better to open faucets versus flush toilets, as the loud noise can startle someone if they’re not expecting air in the toilet supply line.

      Can air in water pipes cause damage?

      Yes. The oxygen in the excess air affects causes corrosion in metal piping, especially when it comes into contact with water. 

      Will an airlock clear itself?

      Hypothetically, an airlock can clear itself over time. However, it’s important to assume control over the situation instead of hoping the situation fixes itself before it creates damage. 

      Related:

      Do you have a persistent gurgling noise in the bathroom sink? See this post on how to fix it:

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      About Plumbing Navigator

      We write about "all things plumbing," helping you navigate common questions, repairs, and the best plumbing products on the market.

      About Plumbing Navigator

      We write about “all things plumbing,” helping you navigate common questions, repairs, and the best plumbing products on the market.

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